Episodes

  • Alisa Cohn: From Start-Up to Grown-Up
    Alisa Cohn has been named the Top Startup Coach in the World by the Thinkers50 Marshall Goldsmith Global Coaches Awards and has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. She was named the number one “Global Guru” of startups in 2021, and has worked with startup companies such as Venmo, Etsy, DraftKings, The Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, and Tory Burch. She has also coached CEOs and C-Suite executives at enterprise clients such as Dell, Hitachi, Sony, IBM, Google, and many more.

    Marshall Goldsmith selected Alisa as one of his Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches – a gathering of the top coaches in the world – and Inc. named Alisa one of the top 100 leadership speakers. Her articles have appeared in Harvard Business Review, Forbes, and Inc. and she has been featured as an expert on Bloomberg TV, the BBC World News and in The New York Times. She is the author of From Start-Up to Grown-Up: Grow Your Leadership to Grow Your Business*.

    In this conversation, Alisa and I discuss the difficult reality that most leaders need to face: saying goodbye to an employee. We detail the mindset you need in preparation for letting someone go. Alisa also helps us with specific language that will help you follow-though on a conversation and help everybody move on — and move forward.
    Key Points

    Our human tendency is often to side-step problems that we need to address.
    By the time you take action to fire somebody, you are likely months late.
    Just because someone was effective in the role previously (or in the last role) doesn’t mean their role is right for them today.
    It’s helpful to be prescriptive in conversations leading up to firing on exactly your expectations — and the actions the other party has agreed to.
    There’s no way to fire someone without it being awkward and painful. You’ll need to make peace with that before you take action.

    Resources Mentioned

    From Start-Up to Grown-Up: Grow Your Leadership to Grow Your Business* by Alisa Cohn

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302)
    How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404)
    How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464)

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  • Michael Bungay Stanier: How to Begin
    Michael Bungay Stanier distills big, complex ideas into practical, accessible knowledge for everyday people so they can be a force for change. His books have sold over a million copies, and The Coaching Habit was a Wall Street Journal bestseller. His TEDx Talk on Taming Your Advice Monster has been viewed more than a million times.

    Michael is the founder of Box of Crayons, a learning and development company that helps organizations transform from advice-driven to curiosity-led action. His new book is titled How to Begin: Start Doing Something That Matters*.

    In this conversation, Michael and I discuss how to make progress when starting something new. We explore the value in looking back at what you’ve already done to support you on what’s next. Plus, Michael highlights the key principles in running effective experiments that transition into new practices.
    Key Points

    Fire bullets at the start. Then, fire cannonballs.
    Discover what your history reveals about your future self. It will open up a window to who you are that will help you when moving on something new.
    When experimenting, don’t make the experiment bigger or more complex than it needs to be.
    Avoid putting too much risk in the experiment or investing too much in its success.
    We have the most learning when we’re struggling with something.

    Resources Mentioned

    How to Begin by Michael Bungay Stanier
    How to Begin overview

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284)
    How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376)
    How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555)

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  • Jennifer Moss: The Burnout Epidemic
    Jennifer Moss is an award-winning journalist, author, and international public speaker. She is a nationally syndicated radio columnist, reporting on topics related to happiness and workplace well-being. She is also a freelance writer whose articles have appeared in HuffPost, Forbes, the Society for Human Resource Management, Fortune, and Harvard Business Review.

    Jennifer’s prior book, Unlocking Happiness at Work, received the distinguished UK Business Book of the Year Award. She also sits on the Global Happiness Council. She is the author of The Burnout Epidemic: The Rise of Chronic Stress and How We Can Fix It*.

    In this conversation, Jennifer and I explore a few misconceptions about burnout — and also how curiosity and empathy can help to reduce it. We discuss a few key questions leaders can ask to gain insight on how to help. Plus, we detail how to avoid confirmation bias through generic interactions.
    Key Points

    Self-care doesn’t cure burnout.
    Curiosity increases empathy — and empathy from leaders is a fabulous antidote to burnout.
    There are two kinds of curiosity, epistemic and perceptual. True empathy comes from a focus on epistemic interactions.
    Go beyond the generic, “How are you?” and instead get more specific with a request like, “Name a high — and a low.” Doing these with a team can help surface how to help.
    Assume the best. It’s ok to say, “Thank you for sharing this with me. I don’t have any advice. I just want to listen and learn.”

    Resources Mentioned

    The Burnout Epidemic: The Rise of Chronic Stress and How We Can Fix It* by Jennifer Moss

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404)
    What to Do With Your Feelings, with Lori Gottlieb (episode 438)
    Leadership Means You Go First, with Keith Ferrazzi (episode 488)

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  • Andrew Warner: Stop Asking Questions
    Andrew Warner is an entrepreneur and host of the Startup Stories podcast, where he uncovers the secrets of the world’s best founders. Over the course of 2,000+ episodes, Andrew has interviewed everyone from Barbara Corcoran, to Gary Vaynerchuk, to the founders of Airbnb.

    After building two startups of his own—one successful and one that failed—Andrew started Mixergy as a way to learn from other entrepreneurs. Today, Mixergy is a place where successful people teach ambitious upstarts through interviews, courses, masterclasses, and events. He is the author of Stop Asking Questions: How to Lead High-Impact Interviews and Learn Anything from Anyone*.

    In this conversation, Andrew and I discuss what he’s learned about getting people to talk from thousands of hours of interviews and research. We explore some of the key tactics that he uses to help people open up in a genuine way. Plus, we discuss some common questions to avoid that may work against your goal to connect well with the other party.
    Key Points

    Help others get comfortable talking about themselves by revealing something about yourself first. They may not reciprocate immediately, but it often opens the door for future depth.
    Just a word or two can open up an entire new level of a conversation. Try using “Because?” or “How so?” as ways to hear more.
    People expect leaders to show up and have a direction for the conversation. Not everything needs to be phrased as a question — you may consider making requests like, “Tell me more,” to direct to conversation.
    Avoid asking questions that try to get people to articulate “most” or “best” answers. People spend too much mental bandwidth trying to rank-order instead of just engaging with the dialogue.
    When potentially uncomfortable situations come up, allow people an easy way out by giving them two paths they can go down.

    Resources Mentioned

    Stop Asking Questions: How to Lead High-Impact Interviews and Learn Anything from Anyone* by Andrew Warner

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344)
    How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454)
    Four Habits That Derail Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 500)

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  • Muriel Wilkins: Coaching Real Leaders
    Muriel Wilkins is Managing Partner and Co-founder of Paravis Partners. She is a C-suite advisor and executive coach with a strong track record of helping already high performing senior leaders take their effectiveness to the next level. She is also the host of the Harvard Business Review podcast, Coaching Real Leaders and is the co-author, with Amy Su of Own the Room: Discover Your Signature Voice to Master Your Leadership Presence*.

    Prior to entrepreneurship, she served on the senior team of U.S. News & World Report and also did marketing and strategy work at Accenture and The Prudential. Muriel has been recognized by the Washington Business Journal as one of Metro-DC area’s Top Minority Business Leaders.

    In this conversation, Muriel and I reflect on our recent client work in order to surface some of the current struggles leaders are facing. We discuss a few trends we’re seeing in relation to diversity, the great resignation, binary thinking, and human relations. Plus, we make a few practical invitations to leaders in order to avoid some common missteps.
    Key Points

    Leaders are making the shift from explanation to inquiry in relations to diversity, equity, and inclusion. The next step for many leaders is to consider how they use their power to affect change to the system in the organization.
    Many leaders are considering the, “Should I stay or should I go?” question without the full context of impact and feeling. Begin by considering the impact you wish to have before making a major change.
    Beware the trap of binary thinking. Often leaders get fixated on “OR thinking” without considering the opportunity for “AND thinking.” If you catch yourself thinking in “ors” consider how you might bring in some “ands.”
    Leaders who inherently see value in people development can tend to write off other leaders who they see as only focused on the numbers. It’s helpful to realize that the larger objective is often shared, but style is different. Meet people on their terms with their language.

    Resources Mentioned

    Own the Room: Discover Your Signature Voice to Master Your Leadership Presence* by Muriel Wilkins
    Coaching Real Leaders podcast

    Related Episodes

    Enhance Your Executive Presence, with Muriel Wilkins (episode 272)
    The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529)
    How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark (episode 550)
    How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*.
    Listener Questions

    Lucus asked us for advice on his reading habits as he makes the transition to CEO.
    Elizabeth wondered the best way to address issues where experienced employees appear resentful about her giving them direction.
    Beth sent us a question about drawing the line between being a friend and a manager.

    Resources Mentioned

    13 Crucial Books That Every Leader Should Know
    Drive* by Daniel Pink
    Readwise
    Day One
    Seven Principles for Leading People Older Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 59)
    How to Manage Former Peers, with Tom Henschel (episode 257)
    Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370)

    Related Episodes

    Three Steps to Soliciting Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 107)
    How to Make Deep Work Happen, with Cal Newport (episode 233)
    Tie Leadership Development to Business Results, with Mark Allen (episode 435)
    How to Help People Thrive, with Jim Harter (episode 532)

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  • David Schonthal: The Human Element
    David Schonthal is an award-winning Professor of Strategy, Innovation & Entrepreneurship at the Kellogg School of Management where he teaches courses on new venture creation, design thinking, healthcare innovation and creativity. In addition to his teaching, he also serves as the Director of Entrepreneurship Programs and the Faculty Director of the Zell Fellows Program.

    Along with his colleague Loran Nordgren, David is one of the originators of Friction Theory – a ground-breaking methodology that explains why even the most promising innovations and change initiatives often struggle to gain traction with their intended audiences – and what to do about it. He is the author with Loran of The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance That Awaits New Ideas*.

    In this conversation, David and I discuss how leaders can do a better job at helping others overcome resistance to a new idea. We explore the distinction between friction and fuel — and why leaders tend to miss opportunities to reduce friction. David also shares several, practical strategies that almost all of us can use to reduce the weight of friction with those we are trying to influence.
    Key Points

    When introducing something new, we tend to think more about fuel than we do about friction. Both are essential for traction.
    Repetition is missed opportunity in most organizations. Leaders tend to want to perfect the details too much.
    Start small with a beacon project to prototype the value change may bring to the organization.
    Leaning in on making a new idea prototypical will help it be more familiar to those you are trying to influence. Emphasize what is similar — not just what is new.
    Analogies can help bridge the gap between the new and the familiar. Use an analogy the audience can relate to.
    Adding an extreme option and/or an undesirable can help transform inertia from a friction into a fuel.

    Resources Mentioned

    The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance That Awaits New Ideas* by Loren Nordgren and David Schonthal

    Related Episodes

    How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249)
    How to Pivot Quickly, with Steve Blank (episode 476)
    The Way Innovators Get Traction, with Tendayi Viki (episode 512)

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  • Jodi-Ann Burey: End Imposter Syndrome in Your Workplace
    Jodi-Ann Burey is a sought-after speaker and writer who works at the intersections of race, culture, and health equity. Her TED talk, “The Myth of Bringing Your Full Authentic Self to Work,” embodies her disruption of traditional narratives about racism at work. Jodi-Ann is also the creator and host of Black Cancer, a podcast about the lives of people of color through their cancer journeys.

    She is the author, with Ruchika Tulshyan, of two recent Harvard Business Review articles: Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome and End Imposter Syndrome in Your Workplace.

    In this conversation, Jodi-Ann and I challenge that notion that imposter syndrome is something that an individual should address alone. Instead, we invite managers and organizations to begin to consider their own contributions to “imposter syndrome” and how we can work together with employees to help everybody move forward. We highlight several key actions that managers can take to begin to end imposter syndrome inside of their organizations.
    Key Points

    Managers and organizations tend to address the symptoms of imposter syndrome, but not the source.
    Those who experience imposter syndrome often feel like it is “death by a thousand paper cuts.”
    Managers can help by reinforcing an employee’s belief in their abilities and chances of success. Listen for what employees are asking for — and explore when they are silent.
    Managers should be transparent about an organization’s locked doors — and demonstrate that they are also willing to be vulnerable.
    In private conversations, managers should redirect perceptions and language that do not accurately reflect the value of their employees.

    Resources Mentioned

    Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome by Jodi-Ann Burey and Ruchika Tulshyan
    End Imposter Syndrome in Your Workplace by Jodi-Ann Burey and Ruchika Tulshyan

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370)
    What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398)
    The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts (episode 552)

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  • Sukhinder Singh Cassidy: Choose Possibility
    Sukhinder Singh Cassidy is a leading technology executive and entrepreneur, board member, and investor with twenty-five years of experience founding and helping to scale companies, including Google, Amazon, and Yodlee. Most recently, she served as president of StubHub, which thrived under her leadership and sold in 2020 right before the pandemic for $4+ billion.

    She is the founder and chairman of the Boardlist and has been profiled in Fortune, Forbes, The Wall Street Journal, Business Week, and The New York Times, among others. She has been named one of Elle’s Power Women, one of the Most Creative People in Business by Fast Company, and one of the Top 100 People in the Valley by Business Insider. She is the author of Choose Possibility: Take Risks and Thrive (Even When You Fail)*.

    In this conversation, Sukhinder and I discuss how to handle a transition in a way that works for both you and the organization you’re leaving. We discuss the value of proactive communication and clear timelines — plus some of the hidden costs of transitioning poorly. Finally, we made the invitation to consider transitions in the context of your long-term career goals.
    Key Points

    Don’t leave before you leave. Putting in maximum effort until you’re gone protects your reputation and the impact you’ve worked to achieve.
    Beware the cost of lingering. You likely know the right timeframe for your departure — use that to frame your transition.
    Leave opportunity in your wake. Use remaining time to set the team up for success, provide coaching and mentoring, and make it an easier transition for others.
    Tie up loose ends before you depart. Leave the team an organization in a place you would want to inherit if you were the new leader coming in.
    Take small steps, middle steps, and big steps. Avoid fixating on the myth of the single choice. Careers come together with many choices, over time.

    Resources Mentioned

    Choose Possibility: Take Risks and Thrive (Even When You Fail)* by Sukhinder Singh Cassidy

    Related Episodes

    How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302)
    The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499)
    Making the Case for Your Promotion, with May Busch (episode 526)

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  • Liz Wiseman: Impact Players
    Liz Wiseman is a researcher and executive advisor. She is the author of the New York Times bestseller Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter*, The Multiplier Effect: Tapping the Genius Inside Our Schools*, and Wall Street Journal bestseller Rookie Smarts*. She is the CEO of The Wiseman Group, a leadership research and development firm headquartered in Silicon Valley.

    Her clients include: Apple, Disney, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Tesla, Twitter, and many others. Liz has been listed on the Thinkers50 ranking and named one of the top 10 leadership thinkers in the world. She is a former Oracle executive, who worked over the course of 17 years as the Vice President of Oracle University and as the global leader for Human Resource Development.

    Liz is the author of Impact Players: How to Take the Lead, Play Bigger, and Multiply Your Impact*. In this conversation, Liz and I discuss the mindset that’s most useful in making real traction in an organization. Plus, we explore practical steps that you can take to think bigger and get noticed for your work.
    Key Points

    The #1 thing managers appreciate: when employees do things that need doing without being asked.
    Upward empathy is the ability to consider what the bosses situation feels like — and what they need from you.
    Pursuing your passion sounds nice in a commencement speech, but can get in the way of what the organization actually needs.
    A job description might be a starting point, but it’s almost never the ending point.
    Beware of becoming the foosball player that does hard work in one spot, but misses the bigger picture. Become a nimble midfielder who plays where they are most needed.

    Resources Mentioned

    Impact Players: How to Take the Lead, Play Bigger, and Multiply Your Impact* by Liz Wiseman
    The Wiseman Group

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Benefit of Being a Rookie, with Liz Wiseman (episode 340)
    Influence Through Overlapping Networks, with Sandie Morgan (episode 422)
    How to Motivate Leaders, with John Maxwell (episode 452)
    Keep Your Ideas From Being Stolen (Dave’s Journal)

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  • David Hutchens: Story Dash
    David Hutchens helps leaders find and tell their stories. He works with leaders around the world to find, craft, and tell their most urgent stories for the purpose of creating shared meaning, preserving culture, disseminating learning, and speeding change in organizations.

    He has taught the Storytelling Leader program at some of the most influential organizations — and he’s written many books, including the Circle of the 9 Muses* and The Leadership Story Deck*. He is the co-creator with longtime friend of the show Susan Gerke of the GO Team program. He's also the author of the new book, Story Dash: Find, Develop, and Activate Your Most Valuable Business Stories...In Just a Few Hours*.

    In this conversation, David and I revisit the power of storytelling and highlight where many leaders go wrong. We explore the common mistakes that David sees in his work all over the world. Plus, we invite listeners into a few practical actions that will help stories land with better impact.
    Key Points
    Four mistakes that leaders make:

    They are not storytelling, sometimes because they don’t see themselves as storytellers or feel like they are performing.
    They don’t connect the story to the strategic intent but never clearly answering the “why am I telling this story?” question.
    They avoid emotional content of stories because they either don’t want to be emotional or are presenting to a “numbers person.”
    They expect it to just happen, instead of making intentional effort to make it happen.

    Resources Mentioned

    To receive David Hutchen’s Story Canvas, reach out to him at david@davidhutchens.com and tell him one valuable tip you gained from this episode.

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148)
    The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450)
    The Way to Earn Attention, with Raja Rajamannar (episode 521)

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  • Minda Harts: Right Within
    Minda Harts is the founder and CEO of The Memo and an advocate for women of color in the workplace. She is a sought-after speaker and thought-leader, frequently speaking on topics of advancing women of color, leadership, diversity, and entrepreneurship. She was named a LinkedIn Top Voice for Equity in the Workplace and was honored as one of BET’s Future 40. She has been a featured speaker at TEDx Harlem, Nike, Levi's, Bloomberg, Google, SXSW, and many other places.

    She is an adjunct assistant professor of public service at NYU. She also hosts Secure the Seat, a career podcast for women of color. Minda is the author of the bestselling book The Memo* and now her new book Right Within: How to Heal From Racial Trauma in the Workplace*.

    In this conversation, Minda and I discuss the daily actions that managers can do to support inclusion in the workplace, especially for women of color. We explore the unfortunate realities of systemic racism that still show up in many workplaces and how we can all do better. Plus, Minda invites us to consider the Manager’s Pledge and six key ways we can bring more equity into our organizations.
    Key Points

    The State of Black Women in Corporate America report finds that in 2020, Black women held 1.6 percent of vice president roles and 1.4 percent of executive suite positions.
    When someone says something racially charged, one of two things tend to happen: laugher or silence. We can do better.
    You don’t need to be the hero, but you do have a responsibility to start.
    All of us will mess up. Take inspiration from the Japanese art of Kintsugi, where the broken pieces reassembled become more beautiful than the original.
    We often miss the opportunities that are right in front of us. Starting there is how each of us bring justice into the world.

    Resources Mentioned

    Right Within: How to Heal From Racial Trauma in the Workplace* by Minda Harts
    Minda’s website

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404)
    How to Support Women of Color, with Minda Harts (episode 506)
    How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510)

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  • Vanessa Bohns: You Have More Influence Than You Think
    Vanessa Bohns is a social psychologist, an award-winning researcher and teacher, and a professor of organizational behavior at Cornell University.

    Her writing and research has been published in top academic journals in psychology, management, and law and has also been featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, and NPR's Hidden Brain. Her book is titled You Have More Influence Than You Think: How We Underestimate Our Power of Persuasion, and Why It Matters*.

    In this conversation, Vanessa and I explore the conclusions of research: we often don’t recognize our own power. We detail some of the common patterns that leaders should watch for in their work. Most importantly, we discuss the practical steps that almost anybody can take to use power more responsibly.
    Key Points

    Power can lead people to underestimate their words and actions. A powerful person's whisper can sound more like a shout to the person they have power over.
    Power tends to lead people to ignore the perspective of others and to feel freer to do whatever they want.
    The effects of power are not inevitable. You can do better for others by thinking about power as responsibility.
    Adopt the lens of a third party in order to see the impact of your actions on others.
    To feel your impact better, ask people what they aren thinking of feeling, rather than simply imagining or assuming.
    One way to experience your influence by taking action to give positive recognition and feedback.

    Resources Mentioned

    You Have More Influence Than You Think: How We Underestimate Our Power of Persuasion, and Why It Matters* by Vanessa Bohns

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254)
    How to Create Meaningful Gatherings, with Priya Parker (episode 395)
    How to Negotiate When Others Have Power, with Kwame Christian (episode 416)

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  • Dorie Clark: The Long Game
    Dorie Clark has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50, and was recognized as the #1 Communication Coach in the world by the Marshall Goldsmith Leading Global Coaches Awards. She is a consultant and keynote speaker and teaches executive education at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School.

    Dorie is the author of the bestselling books Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out which was named the #1 Leadership Book of the Year by Inc. Magazine. She has been described by the New York Times as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives.” She is a frequent contributor to Harvard Business Review and is now the author of her latest book, The Long Game: How to Be a Long-Term Thinker in a Short-Term World*.

    In this conversation, Dorie and I discuss how to win the long game, even when things look bleak today. We examine the typical timelines that most professionals should expect in order to get traction on their work. Plus, we highlight three key questions to ask yourself during the toughest times.
    Key Points

    It’s often 2-3 years of sustained work before you see noticeable progress.
    To become a recognized expert, you should expect at least five years of consistent effort.
    People revisit strategy too often when instead they should often continue to follow their action plan.
    Even if you end up “losing,” strategize up front end how the time and effort you put in is still a win.
    When times are toughest, ask three questions:


    Why am I doing this?
    How has it worked for others?
    What do my trusted advisors say?

    Resources Mentioned

    The Long Game: How to Be a Long-Term Thinker in a Short-Term World* by Dorie Clark
    Long Game Strategic Thinking Self-Assessment

    Interview Notes
    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Value of Being Uncomfortable, with Neil Pasricha (episode 448)
    How to Find Helpful Advisors, with Ethan Kross (episode 516)
    Making the Case for Your Promotion, with May Busch (episode 526)

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  • Nicol Verheem: Teradek
    Nicol Verheem is a globally recognized leader and innovator, senior business executive, serial entrepreneur, and prolific angel investor. He has been recognized for his impact in the film industry with a lifetime achievement award from the Society of Camera Operators and an Academy Award for Sciences and Engineering, also known as a Technical Oscar. He was also recently recognized with the Innovator of the Year Award from the leading business journal in Orange County, California.

    Nicol currently serves on the Executive Management Board of The Vitec Group, as the Divisional CEO of Creative Solutions, and as the CEO of Teradek. As a technology leader, his is responsible for the strategy, roadmap, and execution of Teradek’s highly recognized high tech video products driving more than $100M annual revenue -- with dominant market share across the globe. He is also a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy.

    In this conversation, Nicol and I discuss how to take the ideas you hear in books, presentations, and podcasts — and make them your own. Nicol shares many examples of how he has done this in his organization in order grow a team that was ultimately recognized with an Academy Award. Plus, we discuss some of his mindsets that have helped drive the success of Teradek over the years.
    Key Points

    Leadership models aren’t always molded to your organization or situation. Adapt the idea to make it a better fit for you.
    Well intended language by an expert might not match the culture of your organization. Don’t hesitate to change a word or phrase to make sense to your team.
    Build relationships today with the people who will grow with you throughout your career. That’s “networking for commoners.”
    When interviewing, ask people about their hobbies or interests in order to discover if you can lead them to live out their passions.

    Resources Mentioned

    We'd Like to Thank the Academy by Teradek
    Coaching for Leaders Academy

    Related Episodes

    How to Know What You Don’t Know, with Art Markman (episode 437)
    How to Build an Invincible Company, with Alex Osterwalder (episode 470)
    Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544)

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  • Ashley Brundage: Empowering Differences
    Ashley Brundage is the Founder and President of Empowering Differences. She's overcame homelessness, harassment, and discrimination and then, while seeking employment at a major financial institution, she self-identified during the interview process as a male to female transgender woman and subsequently was hired. She was offered a position and started as a part time bank teller and worked in various lines of business before moving to VP of Diversity & Inclusion in less than 5 years.

    Since beginning transitioning in 2008, she has worked tirelessly to promote awareness and acceptance of gender identity and expression. She serves on the Corporate Advisory Council for the National LGBT Chamber of Commerce. In 2019, she was voted on the National Board of Directors for GLAAD and has also been named one of Florida’s Most Powerful and Influential Women from the National Diversity Council. She is the author of Empowering Differences: Leveraging Differences to Impact Change*.

    In this conversation, Ashley and I discuss her experience in the working world as a transgender woman. We highlight key language that every leader should be aware of to support the differences of others. Plus, we discuss the initial steps that leaders can take in the workplace, especially related to gender identity.
    Key Points

    The harassment and discrimination that transgender people experience also finds its way into the workplace.
    Respect people’s pronouns — and leaders can highlight their own in order to create a safe space for others.
    Comfort and ability to use the restroom is something that organizations should address. A helpful starting point is dialogue and conversation.
    Beware of binary thinking in relation to gender — and many other ways we identify ourselves. Expand your horizon on the gender continuum.

    Resources Mentioned

    Empowering Differences: Leveraging Differences to Impact Change* by Ashley Brundage
    Empowering Differences Self Assessment

    Interview Notes
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    Related Episodes

    What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398)
    How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510)
    Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544)

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  • Carey Nieuwhof: At Your Best
    Carey Nieuwhof is a former lawyer, a bestselling leadership author, a podcaster, and the CEO of Carey Nieuwhof Communications. He speaks to leaders around the world about leadership, change, and personal growth. He writes a widely read leadership blog at CareyNieuwhof.com and also hosts the top-rated Carey Nieuwhof Leadership podcast. He’s the author of At Your Best: How to Get Time, Energy, and Priorities Working in Your Favor*.

    In this conversation, Carey and I explore the reality that so many of us face in both our personal and professional lives: spending time with the wrong kind of people. We discuss how to notice we’re not helping, how to limit time, and what to do when a conversation needs to happen. Plus, we make the invitation to proactively do what often gets missed: spending time with the right people more consistently.
    Key Points

    The people who want your time are rarely the people who should have your time.
    Many leaders give too much time and attention away to people who aren’t helped by the interaction.
    Having a frank conversation with a person who you’re not helping is usually good for both of you.
    If you’re not able to limit interactions with the wrong kind of person, line up those interactions outside of your key energy times.
    A key way to do better at limiting time with the wrong people is to affirmatively decide to spend time with the right people.

    Resources Mentioned

    Burnout Quiz
    At Your Best Today
    At Your Best: How to Get Time, Energy, and Priorities Working in Your Favor* by Carey Nieuwhof

    Interview Notes
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    Related Episodes

    How to Make Deep Work Happen, with Cal Newport (episode 233)
    The Scientific Secrets of Daily Scheduling, with Daniel Pink (episode 332)
    How to Prepare for Conflict, with Amy Gallo (episode 530)

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  • Connson Locke: Making Your Voice Heard
    Connson Locke is Professorial Lecturer in Management at the London School of Economics, where she teaches Leadership, Organizational Behaviour, and Negotiation and Decision Making. She has over 30 years experience as an educator, coach, and consultant working all around the world.

    Her highly popular Guardian Masterclass Developing Your Presence, Power and Influence regularly sells out. Connson is the recipient of a number of teaching awards from the London School of Economics. She's also the author of Making Your Voice Heard: How to Own Your Space, Access Your Inner Power, and Become Influential*.

    In this conversation, Connson and I explore the challenging situation that many professionals experience: speaking up. We discuss several key tactics that she has surfaced in her research to do this more effectively. Plus, we highlight several of the lessons Connson has discovered in her own experience that will help us (and others) do this with more success.
    Key Points

    Managing your negative emotions can help create movement for you. Reflecting or journaling is a key starting point.
    Change your attitude about failure by framing a growth mindset.
    Move away from repetition and towards deliberate practice.
    Instead of focusing on power difference, zero in on the other person’s role in helping you achieve a greater good.
    Plan free time around learning a new skill or helping others instead of watching Netflix or sitting on the beach.

    Resources Mentioned

    Making Your Voice Heard: How to Own Your Space, Access Your Inner Power, and Become Influential* by Connson Locke

    Interview Notes
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    Related Episodes

    Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254)
    Get Noticed Without Selling Out, with Laura Huang (episode 480)
    The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518)
    Jumping In (Dave’s Journal)

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  • Christy Wright: Take Back Your Time
    Christy Wright is a #1 bestselling author, personal growth expert, and host of The Christy Wright Show. She’s also the founder of Business Boutique, which equips women to make money doing what they love. She loves helping women chase their version of success. She's the author of Take Back Your Time: The Guilt-Free Guide to Life Balance*.

    In this conversation, Christy and I explore how to get practical about what’s important, each day. We discuss effectives ways to use timeframes to establish priorities for ourselves — and how those same timeframes can help us turn off work.
    Key Points

    Establishing priorities moves you from a place of feeling like a failure to a place of feeling real success.
    Most of us are clear on our fixed priorities, but we’re less intentional about the flexible priorities that tend to be more practical in daily life.
    Consider establishing priorities through the timeframes of seasons, weeks, and days.
    Having clear priorities helps you not only be productive — but makes it easier to turn it off when it’s time to stop.

    Resources Mentioned

    Take Back Your Time: The Guilt-Free Guide to Life Balance* by Christy Wright

    Related Episodes

    The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319)
    Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431)
    How to Be Present, with Dave Crenshaw (episode 511)

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  • Johnny Taylor, Jr.: Reset
    Johnny Taylor, Jr. is President and CEO of SHRM, the Society for Human Resource Management. Johnny is frequently asked to testify before Congress on critical workforce issues and authors a weekly column, "Ask HR," in USA Today.

    Johnny was chairman of the President's Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities and served as a member of the White House American Workforce Policy Advisory Board during the Trump Administration. He is the author of the new book Reset: A Leader’s Guide to Work in an Age of Upheaval*.

    In this conversation, Johnny and I highlight the current challenges in discovering talent and the populations that have been historically overlooked. We discuss what SHRM’s research and experience are showing to help leaders make better decisions on finding talent. Plus, we explore how to best handle incentives, so that we create the kind of culture that we will value inside our organizations.
    Key Points

    Both line managers in organizations and human resource professionals agree: finding a deep enough talent pool is a big problem.
    Historically, attracting overlooked talent felt right, but may not have been essential to be competitive. Those times are ending for most organizations.
    Studies show that organizations who discover talent in older workers, differently abled workers, veterans, the formerly incarcerated, people of color, and LGBTQ populations see positive, long-term results.
    The incentives for finding overlooked talent often are transactional. To ensure sustainability, leaders must establish this as a value in their organizations.

    Resources Mentioned

    Reset: A Leader’s Guide to Work in an Age of Upheaval* by Johnny Taylor, Jr.

    Interview Notes
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    Related Episodes

    How to Get the Ideal Team Player, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 301)
    Hire the Formerly Incarcerated, with Shelley Winner (episode 447)
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